1. Mandarina Bavaria Hops - Pellets (Germany)

    A tangerine machine when used for late, whirlpool, and dry hop additions, Mandarina Bavaria is quickly finding support in the brewhouse for American IPA and variants, black ales, saisons, Brett fermentations, and other beers where a definite fruity and strongly hoppy character is beneficial. Intense pineapple, lemon and citrus flavors with a resinous, herbal followup. Sweet and distinctive.
  2. Hallertau Blanc Hops - Pellets (Germany)

    Hallertau Blanc Hop Pellets - Specific aroma descriptors include floral and fruity with passion fruit, grapefruit, pineapple, grape and lemongrass overtones.
  3. Northern Brewer Hops - Pellets (Germany)

    Northern Brewer displays pleasant pine and mint characteristics in dual purpose brewing applications, it is grown in the Hallertau region.
  4. Golding Hops - Pellets (UK)

    Goldings are a group of traditional and very popular English aroma hops grown prior to 1790. They tend to have a smooth, sweet flavour.
  5. Tettnang Hops - Pellets (Germany)

    Tettnang is considered a noble aroma hop and has been compared to both Hallertauer and Saazer, but Tettnanger has notably more farnesene content than Hallertauer. They carry a distinct floral and spicy aroma, and, despite the low alpha acids (up to 5%), they are considered to have a balanced “hoppy flavor.”
  6. Hallertau Mittelfruh Hops - Pellets

    This classic German aroma hop is often associated with Bavarian-style lager beers and distinguished by an intense, pleasantly-harmonic bitterness. At one time, this was the major Hallertau landrace variety with a highly acclaimed aroma profile.
  7. Huell Melon Hops - Pellets (Germany)

    Huell Melon Hop Pellets (Germany) - Specific aroma descriptors include distinctive honeydew melon and strawberry.
  8. Czech Saaz Hops - Pellets
    $12.70

    Czech Saaz Hops - Pellets

    Saaz has a very distinctive flavour. When used in beer, the resultant aroma is very mild, earthy, herbal and spicy. Despite its popularity and noble pedigree, Saaz generally has a very low Alpha Acid level and is not very effective as a bittering hop. This hop is generally used for Bohemian style lagers and pilseners.
  9. Fuggle (UK) Hops - Pellets

    Fuggle was first noticed growing "wild" in the hop garden of George Stace Moore's house at Horsmonden in Kent, England in 1861. In 1875 it was introduced by Richard Fuggle who lived in the village of Brenchley (not far from Horsmonden) and hence it was called Fuggle. The aroma is earthier and less sweet than Kent Goldings. Substitutes: Willamette.
  10. Hallertau Tradition (Germany) Hops - Pellets

    A close relative of Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, bred for disease resistance at the Hüll Hop Research Institute in Germany. Very refined, sweet aroma. The aromas of this hop include raisin and plum as well as chocolate and grassy notes. Use for aroma and flavor additions in German lagers.